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Mechanical Engineering

Additional advanced courses in the field of mechanical engineering may be found listed in other engineering options such as aerospace engineering, applied mechanics, applied physics, control and dynamical systems, and materials science. 

EE/ME 7. Introduction to Mechatronics. 6 units (2-3-1). For course description, see Electrical Engineering.

ME 10. Thinking Like an Engineer. 1 unit; first term. A series of weekly seminars by practicing engineers in industry and academia to introduce students to principles and techniques useful for Mechanical Engineering. The course can be used to learn more about the different areas of study within mechanical engineering. Topics will be presented at an informal, introductory level. Required for ME undergraduates. Graded pass/fail. Instructor: Andrade.

ME 11 abc. Thermal Science. 9 units (3-0-6); first, second, third terms. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing required; ME 12 abc, may be taken concurrently. An introduction to classical thermodynamics and transport with engineering applications. First and second laws; closed and open systems; properties of a pure substance; availability and irreversibility; generalized thermodynamic relations; gas and vapor power cycles; propulsion; mixtures; combustion and thermochemistry; chemical equilibrium; momentum and heat transfer including boundary layers with applications to internal and external flows. Not offered on a pass/fail basis. Instructors: Blanquart, Hunt.

ME 12 abc. Mechanics. 9 units (3-0-6); first, second, third terms. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing required; ME 11 abc, may be taken concurrently. An introduction to statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, deformable bodies, and fluids. Equilibrium of force systems, principle of virtual work, distributed force systems, friction, static analysis of rigid and deformable structures, hydrostatics, kinematics, particle dynamics, rigid-body dynamics, Euler’s equations, ideal flow, vorticity, viscous stresses in fluids, dynamics of deformable systems, waves in fluids and solids. Not offered on a pass/fail basis. Instructors: Mello, Asimaki, Daraio. 

ME 13/113. Mechanical Prototyping. 4 units (0-4-0); first, second, summer terms. Enrollment is limited and is based on responses to a questionnaire available in the Registrar’s Office. Introduction to the technologies and practices needed to fabricate mechanical prototypes. Students will acquire the fundamental skills necessary to begin using 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software. Students will learn how to build parametric models of parts and assemblies and learn how to generate detailed drawings of their designs. Students will also be introduced to manual machining techniques, as well as computer-controlled prototyping technologies, such as three-dimensional printing, laser cutting, and water jet cutting. Students will receive safety-training, instruction on the theories underlying different machining methods, and hands-on demonstrations of machining and mechanical assembly methods. Several prototypes will be constructed using the various technologies available in the mechanical engineering machine shop. Instructors: Van Deusen, Dominguez. 

ME 14. Design and Fabrication. 9 units (3-5-1); third term. Prerequisites: ME 12ab, ME 13. Enrollment is limited and is based on responses to a questionnaire available in the Registrar’s office. Introduction to mechanical engineering design, fabrication, and visual communication. Concepts are taught through a series of short design projects and design competitions emphasizing physical concepts. Many class projects will involve substantial use of the shop facilities, and construction of working prototypes. Not offered on a pass/fail basis. Instructors: Mello, Van Deusen. 

ME 23/123. CNC Machining. 4 units (0-4-0); third, summer terms. Prerequisites: ME 13/113. Enrollment is limited and is based on responses to a questionnaire available in the Registrar’s office. Introduction to computer numerical control machining. Students will learn to create Gcode and Mcode using Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software; they will be instructed on how to safely prepare and operate the machine’s functions; and will be taught how to implement programmed data into several different types of CNC equipment. The class will cover the parts and terminology of the equipment, fixturing materials, setting workpiece, and tool offsets. Weekly assignments will include the use of CAM software, machine operation demonstrations, and machining projects. Instructors: Van Deusen, Dominguez.

ME 50 ab. Experiments and Modeling in Mechanical Engineering. 9 units (0-6-3); second, third terms. Prerequisites: ME 11 abc, ME 12 abc, ME 13, ME 14, and programming skills at the level of ACM 11. Laboratory experiments and modeling of systems relevant to Mechanical Engineering. Instructor: Mello.

ME 72 ab. Engineering Design Laboratory. 9 units (3-4-2) first term; (1-8-0) second term. Prerequisites: ME 14. Enrollment is limited. A project-based course in which teams of students design, fabricate, analyze, test, and operate an electromechanical device to compete against devices designed by other student teams. The class lectures and the projects stress the integration of mechanical design, sensing, engineering analysis, and computation to solve problems in engineering system design. The laboratory units of ME 72 can be used to fulfill a portion of the laboratory requirement for the EAS option. Not offered on a pass/fail basis. Instructors: Mello, Van Deusen. 

CS/EE/ME 75 abc. Multidisciplinary Systems Engineering. 3 units (2-0-1), 6 units (2-0-4), or 9 units (2-0-7) first term; 6 units (2-3-1), 9 units (2-6-1), or 12 units (2-9-1) second and third terms; For course description, see Computer Science. 

ME 90 abc. Senior Thesis, Experimental. 9 units; (0-0-9) first term; (0-9-0) second, third terms. Prerequisites: senior status; instructor’s permission. Experimental research supervised by an engineering faculty member. The topic selection is determined by the adviser and the student and is subject to approval by the Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Committee. First and second terms: midterm progress report and oral presentation during finals week. Third term: completion of thesis and final presentation. The second and third terms may be used to fulfill laboratory credit for EAS. Not offered on a pass/fail basis. Instructor: Blanquart. 

ME 100. Independent Studies in Mechanical Engineering. Units are assigned in accordance with work accomplished. A faculty mentor will oversee a student proposed, independent research or study project to meet the needs of undergraduate students. Graded pass/fail. The consent of a faculty mentor and a written report is required for each term of work. 

Ae/APh/CE/ME 101 abc. Fluid Mechanics. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/AM/CE/ME 102 abc. Mechanics of Structures and Solids. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace.

E/ME 103. Management of Technology. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Engineering.

E/ME/MedE 105 ab. Design for Freedom from Disability. 9 units (3-0-6); second, third terms. For course description, see Engineering.

EST/EE/ME 109. Energy Technology and Policy. 9 units (3-0-6); first term. For course description, see Energy Science and Technology.

ME 110. Special Laboratory Work in Mechanical Engineering. 3–9 units per term; maximum two terms. Special laboratory work or experimental research projects may be arranged by members of the faculty to meet the needs of individual students as appropriate. A written report is required for each term of work. Instructor: Staff. 

CE/ME 112 ab. Hydraulic Engineering. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Civil Engineering.

ME 115 ab. Introduction to Kinematics and Robotics. 9 units (3-0-6); second, third terms. Prerequisites: Ma 2, ACM 95/100 ab recommended. Introduction to the study of planar, rotational, and spatial motions with applications to robotics, computers, computer graphics, and mechanics. Topics in kinematic analysis will include screw theory, rotational representations, matrix groups, and Lie algebras. Applications include robot kinematics, mobility in mechanisms, and kinematics of open and closed chain mechanisms. Additional topics in robotics include path planning for robot manipulators, dynamics and control, and assembly. Course work will include laboratory demonstrations using simple robot manipulators. Not offered 2017–18.

MS/ME/MedE 116. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. 9 units (3-0-6); second term. For course description, see Materials Science.

ME 117. Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes. 9 units (3-0-6); first term. Prerequisites: ME 11 abc, ME 12 abc, ACM 95 or equivalent. This course provides a parallel treatment of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from the nanoscale continuously to the macroscale. Topics include energy transport in the form of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at the nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.  Not offered 2017–18.

Ae/ME 118. Classical Thermodynamics. 9 units (3-0-6); first term. For course description, see Aerospace.

ME 119 ab. Heat and Mass Transfer. 9 units (3-0-6); second, third terms. Prerequisites: ME 11 abc, ME 12 abc, ACM 95/100 (may be taken concurrently). Transport properties, conservation equations, conduction heat transfer, convective heat and mass transport in laminar and turbulent flows, phase change processes, thermal radiation. Instructor: Minnich.

Ae/ME 120 ab. Combustion Fundamentals. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace.

ME/CS 133 ab. Robotics. 9 units (3-6-0); first, second terms. The course focuses on current topics in robotics research in the area of robotic manipulation and sensing. Past topics have included advanced manipulator kinematics, grasping and dextrous manipulation using multifingered hands, and advanced obstacle avoidance and motion planning algorithms. Additional topics include robotics research in the area of autonomous navigation and vision. Including mobile robots, multilegged walking machines, use of vision in navigation systems. The lectures will be divided between a review of the appropriate analytical techniques and a survey of the current research literature. Course work will focus on an independent research project chosen by the student. Instructor: Burdick.

CS/EE/ME 134. Autonomy. 9 units (3-0-6); third term. For course description, see Computer Science.

AM/CE/ME 150 abc. Graduate Engineering Seminar. 1 unit; each term. For course description, see Applied Mechanics.

Ae/Ge/ME 160 ab. Continuum Mechanics of Fluids and Solids. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace.

MS/ME 161. Imperfections in Crystals. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Materials Science.

ME/CE 163. Mechanics and Rheology of Fluid-Infiltrated Porous Media. 9 units (3-0-6); third term. Prerequisites: Continuum Mechanics - Ae/Ge/ME 160 ab. This course will focus on the physics of porous materials (e.g., geomaterials, biological tissue) and their intimate interaction with interstitial fluids (e.g., water, oil, blood). The course will be split into two parts: Part 1 will focus on the continuum mechanics (balance laws) of multi-phase solids, with particular attention to fluid diffusion-solid deformation coupling. Part 2 will introduce the concept of effective stresses and state of the art rheology available in modeling the constitutive response of representative porous materials. Emphasis will be placed on poro-elasticity and poro-plasticity. Instructor: Andrade.

AM/ME 165 ab. Elasticity. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Applied Mechanics.

MS/ME 166. Fracture of Brittle Solids. 9 units (3-0-6); third term. For course description, see Materials Science.

CE/ME/Ge 173. Mechanics of Soils. 9 units (3-0-6); second term. For course description, see Civil Engineering.

ME/CE/Ge 174. Mechanics of Rocks. 9 units (3-0-6); third term. Prerequisites: Ae/Ge/ME 160a. Basic principles of deformation, strength, and stressing of rocks. Elastic behavior, plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, creep, damage, friction, failure mechanisms, shear localization, and interaction of deformation processes with fluids. Engineering and geological applications. Not offered 2017–18.

EST/MS/ME 199. Special Topics in Energy Science and Technology. Units to be arranged. For course description, see Energy Science and Technology.

ME 200. Advanced Work in Mechanical Engineering. A faculty mentor will oversee a student proposed, independent research or study project to meet the needs of graduate students. Graded pass/fail. The consent of a faculty mentor and a written report is required for each term of work. 

ME 201. Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 9 units (3-0-6). The faculty will prepare courses on advanced topics to meet the needs of graduate students. 

ME 202 abc. Engineering Two-Phase Flows. 9 units (3-0-6). Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 ab, Ae/APh/CE/ME 101 abc, or equivalents. Selected topics in engineering two-phase flows with emphasis on practical problems in modern hydro-systems. Fundamental fluid mechanics and heat, mass, and energy transport in multiphase flows. Liquid/vapor/gas (LVG) flows, nucleation, bubble dynamics, cavitating and boiling flows, models of LVG flows; instabilities, dynamics, and wave propagation; fluid/structure interactions. Discussion of two-phase flow problems in conventional, nuclear, and geothermal power plants, marine hydrofoils, and other hydraulic systems. Not offered 2017–18. 

Ae/AM/MS/ME 213. Mechanics and Materials Aspects of Fracture. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/AM/CE/ME 214 ab. Computational Solid Mechanics. 9 units (3-5-1). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/AM/ME 215. Dynamic Behavior of Materials. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/ME 218. Statistical Mechanics. 9 units (3-0-6); second term. For course description, see Aerospace.

CE/Ge/ME 222. Earthquake Source Processes, Debris Flows, and Soil Liquefaction: Physics-based Modeling of Failure in Granular Media. 6 units (2-0-4); third term. For course description, see Civil Engineering.

Ae/AM/ME 223. Plasticity. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/AM/ME/Ge 225. Special Topics in Solid Mechanics. Units to be arranged. For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/ACM/ME 232 abc. Computational Fluid Dynamics. 9 units (3-0-6). For course description, see Aerospace. 

Ae/CDS/ME 251 ab. Closed Loop Flow Control. 9 units; (3-0-6 a, 1-3-5- b). For course description, see Aerospace.

ME/MS 260. Micromechanics. 9 units (3-0-6); third term. Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent, and Ae/AM/CE/ME 102 abc or Ae 160 abc or instructor’s permission. The course gives a broad overview of micromechanics, emphasizing the microstructure of materials, its connection to molecular structure, and its consequences on macroscopic properties. Topics include phase transformations in crystalline solids, including martensitic, ferroelectric, and diffusional phase transformations, twinning and domain patterns, active materials; effective properties of composites and polycrystals, linear and nonlinear homogenization; defects, including dislocations, surface steps, and domain walls; thin films, asymptotic methods, morphological instabilities, self-organization; selected applications to microactuation, thin-film processing, composite materials, mechanical properties, and materials design. Open to undergraduates with instructor’s permission. Instructor: Bhattacharya.

ME/Ge/Ae 266 ab. Dynamic Fracture and Frictional Faulting. 9 units (3-0-6); second, third terms. Prerequisites: Ae/AM/CE/ME 102 abc or Ae/Ge/ME 160 ab or instructor’s permission. Introduction to elastodynamics and waves in solids. Dynamic fracture theory, energy concepts, cohesive zone models. Friction laws, nucleation of frictional instabilities, dynamic rupture of frictional interfaces. Radiation from moving cracks. Thermal effects during dynamic fracture and faulting. Crack branching and faulting along nonplanar interfaces. Related dynamic phenomena, such as adiabatic shear localization. Applications to engineering phenomena and physics and mechanics of earthquakes. Not offered 2017–18.

ME 300. Research in Mechanical Engineering. Hours and units by arrangement. Research in the field of mechanical engineering. By arrangement with members of the faculty, properly qualified graduate students are directed in research.